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Dogs 101: Pugs Most Popular Small Dog Breeds – Animal Facts

By November 29, 2018



Most Popular Cute Small Dog Breeds Pugs Dogs 101 Smallest Dogs

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From wikipedia: The Pug is a breed of dog with a wrinkly, short-muzzled face, and curled tail. The breed has a fine, glossy coat that comes in a variety of colours, most often fawn or black, and a compact square body with well-developed muscles.

Pugs were brought from China to Europe in the sixteenth century and were popularized in Western Europe by the House of Orange of the Netherlands, and the House of Stuart.[2] In the United Kingdom, in the nineteenth century, Queen Victoria developed a passion for pugs which she passed on to other members of the Royal family.

Pugs are known for being sociable and gentle companion dogs.[3] The breed remains popular into the twenty-first century, with some famous celebrity owners. A pug was judged Best in Show at the World Dog Show in 2004.

While the pugs that are depicted in eighteenth century prints tend to be long and lean,[2] modern breed preferences are for a square cobby body, a compact form, a deep chest, and well-developed muscle.[5] Their smooth and glossy coats can be fawn, apricot fawn, silver fawn, or black.[5][6] The markings are clearly defined, and there is a trace of a black line extending from the occiput to the tail.[5] The tail normally curls tightly over the hip.[2]

Pugs have two distinct shapes for their ears, “rose” and “button”. “Rose” ears are smaller than the standard style of “button” ears, and are folded with the front edge against the side of the head. Breeding preference goes to “button” style ears.[7]

Pugs’ legs are very strong, straight, of moderate length, and are set well under. Their shoulders are moderately laid back. Their ankles are strong, their feet are small, their toes are well split-up, and their nails are black.[5] The lower teeth normally protrude further than their upper, resulting in an under-bite.

In ancient times, Pugs were bred to be companions for ruling families in China. The pet Pugs were highly valued by Chinese Emperors, and the royal dogs were kept in luxury and guarded by soldiers.[3] Pugs later spread to other parts of Asia. In Tibet, Buddhist monks kept Pugs as pets in their monasteries.[3] The breed has retained its affectionate devotion to its owners since ancient times.[3]

The early history of the Pug is not attested to in detail; it is accepted that modern Pugs are descended from dogs imported to Europe from China in the 16th century. Similar dogs were popular in the Imperial court during the Song Dynasty.

Pugs were popular at European courts, and reportedly become the official dog of the House of Orange in 1572 after a Pug named Pompey saved the life of the Prince of Orange by alerting him to the approach of assassins.[1]

A Pug travelled with William III and Mary II when they left the Netherlands to accept the throne of England in 1688.[2] During this period, the Pug may have been bred with the old type King Charles spaniel, giving the modern King Charles Spaniel its Pug characteristics.[13]

The breed eventually became popular in other European countries as well. Pugs were painted by Goya in Spain, and in Italy they rode up front on private carriages, dressed in jackets and pantaloons that matched those of the coachman. They were used by the military to track animals and people, and were also employed as guard dogs.

The English painter William Hogarth was the devoted owner of a series of Pugs. His 1745 self-portrait, which is now in London’s Tate Gallery, includes his Pug, Trump.[14] The Pug was also well known in Italy. In 1789, a Mrs. Piozzi wrote in her journal, “The little Pug dog or Dutch mastiff has quitted London for Padua, I perceive. Every carriage I meet here has a Pug in it.”[15] The popularity of the Pug continued to spread in France during the eighteenth century. Before her marriage to Napoleon Bonaparte, Joséphine had her Pug Fortune carry concealed messages to her family while she was confined at Les Carmes prison, it having alone been given visiting rights.[16]

In nineteenth century England, the breed flourished under the patronage of Queen Victoria. Her many Pugs, which she bred herself, included Olga, Pedro, Minka, Fatima and Venus.[2] Her involvement with dogs in general helped to establish the Kennel Club, which was formed in 1873.[2] Queen Victoria favoured apricot and fawn colours. Queen Victoria’s passion for Pugs was passed on to many other members of the Royal family, including her grandson King George V[17] and his son King Edward VIII. Many responded to the breed’s image of anti-functionalism and diminutive size during this period.

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