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Dogs 101: Miniature Schnauzer Most Popular Dog Breeds Re-Edit – Animal Facts

By January 15, 2019



Miniature Schnauzer Dogs 101 Most Popular Dog Breeds

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From Wikipedia: The Miniature Schnauzer is a breed of small dog of the Schnauzer type that originated in Germany in the mid-to-late 19th century. Miniature Schnauzers developed from crosses between the Standard Schnauzer and one or more smaller breeds such as the Poodle and Affenpinscher, as farmers bred a small dog that was an efficient ratting dog. They are described as “spunky”[1] but aloof dogs, with good guarding tendencies without some guard dogs’ predisposition to bite. Miniature Schnauzers are recognized in three colors internationally: solid black, black and silver, and a color known as ‘salt and pepper’. There is a controversial fourth color variant in Miniature Schnauzers, pure white, which is not recognized universally.

The breed remains one of the most popular worldwide, primarily for its temperament and relatively small size. As of 2013 it is the 17th most popular breed in the U.S.

Miniature Schnauzers have a very square-shaped build, measuring 13 to 14 inches (33 to 36 cm) tall and weighing 10 to 15 pounds (4.5 to 6.8 kg) for females and 11 to 18 pounds (5.0 to 8.2 kg) for males.[1] They have a double coat, with wiry exterior fur and a soft undercoat. In show trim, the coat is kept short on the body, but the fur on the ears, legs, belly, and face is retained.[10] Recognized coat colors are black, salt and pepper, black and silver, and pure white.[11]

Miniature Schnauzers are often described as non-moulting dogs, and while this is not entirely true, their shedding is minimal and generally unnoticeable. They are characterized by a rectangular head with bushy beard, mustache and eyebrows; teeth that meet in a “scissor bite”; oval and dark colored eyes; and v-shaped, natural forward-folding ears (when cropped, the ears point straight upward and come to a sharp point). Their tails are naturally thin and short, and may be docked (where permitted). They will also have very straight, rigid front legs, and feet that are short and round (so-called “cat feet”) with thick, black pads.[5][12]

Docking of tails and cropping of ears has become a controversial practice, especially for non-working dogs, and is now illegal or restricted in a number of countries worldwide.[13]

The earliest records surrounding the development of the Standard Schnauzer in Germany come from the late 19th century. They were originally bred to be medium-sized farm dogs in Germany, equally suited to rating, herding, and guarding property.[1] As time passed, farmers bred the Standard Schnauzer into a smaller, more compact size for rating by combining it with the Affenpinscher and Miniature Poodle.[1][3] The first recorded Miniature Schnauzer appeared in 1888, and the first exhibition was held in 1899.[3][4]

The AKC accepted registration of the new breed in 1926, two years after Miniature Schnauzers were introduced to the United States.[5][4] They were originally known as Wirehaired Pinschers.[6] International Kennel Club classifications vary; in the United Kingdom and Australia, they fall within the Utility Group, while in Canada they are in the Working Group. In the AKC the Miniature Schnauzer is classed with the Terriers.[4] It was recognized by the United Kennel Club in 1948 and also classed as a terrier.[7] The start of the modern Miniature Schnauzer is generally considered, to begin with Ch. Dorem Display, the first Miniature Schnauzer to win Best in Show at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show.[8] He was born 5 April 1945 and lived to be nearly fourteen.[8] Almost every living Miniature Schnauzer in America can trace its lineage back to Dorem Display.[8]

Miniature Schnauzers were the 11th most popular breed in the U.S. in 2008, falling to 16th most popular in 2015.[9]
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